Root Canal Sedatives

Do you need to have a root canal performed and wonder what type of pain medicine is used? Contact Buffalo Endodontist Dr. Aaron McCann to gently treat your oral pain and discuss why we don’t use root canal sedatives. At Precision Endodontics, we believes that root canals should be comfortable and painless.

Buffalo Endodontist Discusses Root Canal Sedatives

This educational video was brought to you by Dr. Aaron McCann, an experienced Buffalo Endodontist specializing in root canals.

As a Buffalo Endodontist, I am often asked about root canal sedation options.

  • You might wonder if you need root canal sedatives, or whether the experience itself is something you don’t want to remember. In fact, it should be boring.
  • I have never sedated a patient, and there are several reasons not to use root canal sedatives.
  • In addition to the cost of root canal sedatives, you’ll need a driver. You’ll lose a whole day of work, and need someone to watch you until the sedation wears off.
  • We make the experience both comfortable and pleasant for you so that, once the anesthesia goes away, you can go about your normal life.  Root canal sedatives are not needed.

Download Our Free Root Canal Guide

Root Canal FAQs

How can I choose the best endodontist?

The first thing we suggest is a recommendation from your general dentist. If you have confidence in your dentist, you can have confidence in the specialist to whom they refer you. Speak with friends and family who can share their personal opinions. Do some research on the specific doctor, such as where they did their training and how much training they’ve had, what types of technology they’re using, and to ensure that they offer state-of-the-art treatment that follows the standard of care in every aspect.

Are endodontic treatments covered by insurance?

When patients ask about dental insurance coverage, we tell them that most dental insurances will cover at least part of their procedure – and some even cover 100%.

The extent of coverage is based on your employer and your specific plan, but our office staff will work with you and help submit your paperwork.

We can also provide a pre-estimate to give you a clearer picture of your potential out-of-pocket cost.

What is an apicoectomy?

A patient may be having difficulty with a previously performed root canal that might become re-infected. Maybe there’s infection in a tooth on which you’ve had extensive restorative work. We can use a local surgery called an apicoectomy to help take care of that infection. We numb the area just as if you were having a regular root canal and, while looking through a microscope, work down from the top of the tooth, removing the source of infection and performing a reverse root canal.

What are the success rates of root canals and crowns?

The success rate for root canal treatment is very high. When we complete treatment on a tooth that had no prior infection and was just beginning to show symptoms, a crown installed by your dentist will give you years – or even decades – of success with your tooth.

 

How did my tooth get infected in the first place?

One way or another, bacteria found its way inside your tooth and caused infection. There may be a crack in your tooth or you may have had trauma to your tooth. Cavities are caused by bacteria slowly working their way inside the tooth and causing problems. The tooth will become inflamed, and you might have a toothache or sensitivity when you drink ice cold water or eat ice cream or other sweets.

What are the main causes of tooth decay?

Diet and/or hygiene-related habits are the main causes of tooth decay. The best way to prevent tooth decay is to brush your teeth several times a day (with a toothpaste containing fluoride) and to floss one time every day. As much as possible, avoid items such as acidic foods, soft drinks and candy. Foods containing sugar feed bacteria and cause cavities.

Why would I need a root canal?

A lot of people ask, “Why can’t I just take an antibiotic and make the infection go away?” If you take an antibiotic, it will help your symptoms go away, but the problem is inside the tooth. The only way to fix the problem is to go inside the tooth with a root canal procedure. We can actually go in and take care of the problem once and for all.

How do I know I have a root canal problem?

The pressure of chewing your food may start to bother you more. Cold temperatures may cause pain, or the heat of your coffee may bother your teeth. Those issues may indicate a root canal problem and, if you notice lumps, or swelling, you should be examined.

Can all teeth be treated with a root canal?

The benefit of seeing an endodontist who specializes in root canal therapy lies in the extra training they undergo. This extensive training enables us to perform endodontic treatments on virtually any tooth. Because we use a microscope to guide every procedure, we can locate canals and highly calcified areas that others might miss. They would, therefore, be unable to complete the same type of treatment and help save your tooth.

What is root canal retreatment?

Most root canal treatments are successful. However, retreatment is sometimes needed. Cases that were done elsewhere are sometimes sent to us for evaluation and help in developing a remedial plan. A root canal procedure that fails is usually attributable to bacteria that remain in the canal or, gradually seep back in and re-infect the tooth.

Can a root canal cause an illness?

A common question currently circulating on the internet concerns the possibility that root canal therapy can cause other medical problems.

We encourage patients to visit the American Academy of Endodontists’ website and read their published paper. It includes hundreds of references – none of which support any such claims. A dental infection is a localized infection which, if not treated, can become a systemic problem. Because the materials we use are inert, the focal infection theory is no cause for concern.

How can a root canal save my tooth?

Because the roots of your teeth are actually like pipes – meaning they’re hollow in the middle – each one has a root canal inside where the nerve and the blood supply are located. When you’re young, the nerves and cells that help teeth form are located there. As you get older, if cavities form, bacteria are able to enter the tooth and cause inflammation or infection. Root canal treatment goes through the tooth into those canals, cleaning, disinfecting, and then sealing them to prevent further issues. Root canal treatment helps save your tooth and keep it healthy.

How much does a root canal cost?

Aside from the anticipated pain of the root canal procedure itself – people are most concerned about the cost. It’s difficult to give exact fees up front because we must first make a diagnosis and determine which tooth is affected. It’s also important to know if there’s been a previous root canal. Are we redoing something, or are we performing a surgery? Although fees vary based on the specifics of your case, the cost of replacing your tooth is usually greater than the cost of helping you save it.

How long does a root canal procedure take?

Most root canal or root canal surgery procedures are completed within an hour to an hour and a half. Almost all procedures require only one visit unless we feel that you would benefit from a quick 20 or 30-minute follow-up appointment.

Do I need a root canal if I am not showing symptoms?

Sometimes a person who is not having trouble with their teeth needs a root canal. Most of us would prefer not to have work done unless we’re suffering. But an infected tooth may not necessarily show any symptoms. A persistent problem may become a chronic issue without your being aware of it until it becomes a larger problem. If you have swelling or a great deal of pain, your dentist will send you to us to fix your infection problem.

What are the differences between pulling a tooth and having a root canal?

When you come in to see us because of a tooth-related issue, our main concern is your best options. We try to establish a healthy state for your tooth and enable you to enjoy a good quality of life and retain your tooth. Sometimes, however, it may be more beneficial for you to remove the tooth and install a replacement.

Is an implant better than a root canal?

Because of dental implant advertisements on television and radio, people frequently ask why they shouldn’t just have their teeth removed and replaced with implants. Both options are great because implants are the best alternative for replacing lost teeth. Keeping your natural teeth healthy and comfortable as long as possible is the ideal – and retaining natural teeth is the goal of our office. If that isn’t the best choice for you, however, we will speak with your dentist or oral surgeon about the possibility of implants.

Download Our Free Root Canal Guide

RELATED BLOG POSTS

<script type=”text/javascript” src=”//sites.yext.com/209190-reviews.js”></script>
DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE APP
mobile-apps
BUFFALO ENDODONTIC AND ROOT CANAL VIDEO FAQS
RELATED VIDEOS
CONTACT OUR OFFICE